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<h1 align="center">Administration tutorial</h1>
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      <p align="center"><b><font color="#FF3333" size="2">This is preliminary 
        documentation and is subject to change</font></b></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This document assumes you have installed 
        correctly the Defect Control system, and you can log in as 'ttsadmin' 
        user. Following you will find some guidelines on how to setup the tool 
        to track your project. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;The first thing you may want to do as 
        an administrator, is setting up the different lookup tables that will 
        be used during everyday use. If you logged in as ttsadmin, you will be 
        now in the main screen. You should see &quot;you are logged in as ttsadmin, 
        and you have administrator privilege. &quot;. Go to the <b>administer</b> 
        option in the bottom. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;A normal initial setup will involve 
        adding <b>projects</b>, <b>software</b> packages, software <b>releases</b> 
        and <b>users</b>. These tables are releted as in the following diagram. 
        It has been simplified only representing affected selected tables: </font></p>
      <p align="center"><font size="2"><img src="images/db_proj_soft_releases.gif" width="400" height="366"></font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Before start setting up the structure, 
        it can be good idea to prepare a brief draft of your project's organization, 
        which will help you assigning the identifiers of the different parts as 
        needed. For this tutorial, we are using a sample project, the defect control 
        itself, for which we indeed used this schema: </font></p>
      <p align="center"><font size="2"><img src="images/sample_schema_1.gif"></font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Here we represent one <b>project</b>, 
        'Defect Control', formed by five main components or <b>software</b> packages 
        (database structure, defect logic core, statistics module, query module 
        and administration module). Each of these components will develop and 
        result in several component <b>releases</b>. In the next diagram, we have 
        added the identifiers to all these elements. </font></p>
      <p align="center"><font size="2"><img src="images/sample_schema_2.gif"></font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Note that for projects, the identifier 
        corresponds to the IdProject, for software the identifier corresponds 
        to IdSoftware and for releases, IdRelease. Another detail worth to mention 
        is the election of ids for releases. Identifers must be unique in its 
        table, but they are not required to be consecutive, so we choose to start 
        each package at a multiple of ten. This is just a convention, and produces 
        clearer output when listing releases, because they are sorted by id, and 
        then adding a new release for one software package will appear following 
        the rest for this package. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;From now on, you will use the table 
        administrator for entering new values or editing existing ones. It should 
        be noted that identifier values are used internally by the system, so 
        normally is not a good idea to alter them once the tool is in production. 
        This is one reason why it is a good idea to to take a few minutes elaborating 
        the prevoius draft schema. That said, let&acute;s start entering records. 
        </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Go to 'projects' table. There you will 
        find the current projects available. You will normally find one default 
        entry, TTStest, which is the Defect control project. You can edit this 
        entry, and replace by one of your own projects. Go to the edit link, and 
        replace the sname and sdesc (for description) values with yours. When 
        you are done, click accept. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Repeat this process in case you want 
        more than one project, and remember the ids you assigned to each of them, 
        as they will be used when entering the software packages. Just click on 
        the 'Add new register' option and follow the same procedure. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;For our sample, we will be using the 
        'Defect control' project, with id 0. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Once you are done with projects, click 
        on the 'administer' icon in top toolbar to return to the administration 
        menu and choose the 'Software' link. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Normally, you will add here the main 
        software packages that form your project, maybe libraries, or individual 
        programs. Proceed as previously, adding a unique id for each of them, 
        a name, and, more important, the id of the project they refer to. This 
        field will link the new record with its software project. In our example, 
        we add records for </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Go back again to the administer page, 
        and add the software releases, taking into account the release id and 
        the software id each record is linked to. </font></p>
      <h2><font size="2"><a name="users"></a>Users</font></h2>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Last step in a normal setup involves 
        adding the users to the system. There are several fields you may want 
        to fill in, and some others you can leave empty, so the user herself will 
        fill. The following table contains description of fields, and their meaning. 
        </font></p>
      <table width="95%" border="0" cellspacing="2" cellpadding="2" align="center">
        <tr bgcolor="#CCCCFF"> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2"><b>Field</b></font></td>
          <td width="7%"><font size="2"><b>Required?</b></font></td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2"><b>Meaning</b></font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">id</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">YES</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Unique user identifier. Once assigned, 
            should not be changed</font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">name</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">YES</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">User login account name. </font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">email</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">YES</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Email address used for notifications.</font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">password</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">YES</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Password to log in the system.</font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">contact phone</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">NO</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Can be entered by the user</font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">contact address</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">NO</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Can be entered by the user</font></td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">is admin</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">YES</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">A value of 't' means user has administrator 
            privilege</font> </td>
        </tr>
        <tr> 
          <td width="23%"><font size="2">id default project</font></td>
          <td width="7%"> 
            <div align="center"><font size="2">NO</font></div>
          </td>
          <td width="70%"><font size="2">Can be entered by the user</font></td>
        </tr>
      </table>
      <p>&nbsp;<font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;Administrator privilege allows the user 
        to enter the administration menu, and thus, performing any operation available 
        there, like altering all the system tables content (even deleting the 
        records from <b>all</b> tables). Take this into account before giving 
        such access level. The value 't' stands for True in the Postgres database 
        backend, which is the default one. </font></p>
      <p><font size="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;At this point, you have finished the 
        basic setup. From here on, you can proceed with the <a href="user_tut.php">user 
        tutorial</a>, or directly to the <a href="reference.php">reference manual</a>. 
        </font></p>
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